Legal Challenge Arises as Half-Life YouTuber Sues Ubisoft Over The Crew’s Shutdown

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In a move that shakes the foundations of gaming consumer rights, Ross Scott, famously known for his Half-Life series “Freeman’s Mind” on his YouTube channel ‘Accursed Farms,’ has announced plans for a class-action lawsuit against gaming giant Ubisoft. The lawsuit centers on the controversial shutdown of Ubisoft’s racing game, “The Crew.”

Key Highlights:

  • Ross Scott, a renowned Half-Life YouTuber, plans a class-action lawsuit against Ubisoft due to the shutdown of the racing game, The Crew.
  • Ubisoft’s decision to close The Crew’s servers, scheduled for March 31, 2024, is seen as a “gray area” in video game consumer law.
  • Scott argues that Ubisoft rendered The Crew “unusable,” depriving owners of its value post-sale.
  • The YouTuber seeks to establish a lawsuit challenging the legality of such game shutdowns, fearing a precedent that undermines consumer rights in gaming.
  • Ubisoft’s end-user license agreement (EULA) states that the game is “licensed,” not sold, allowing them to alter the game’s terms.

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The Crew’s Controversial Shutdown

The Crew, initially released in 2014, was delisted in December 2023 with its servers scheduled to shut down on March 31, 2024. This decision has sparked significant controversy and raised questions about the rights of consumers in the digital gaming age. Scott, a prominent figure in the gaming community with over 330,000 YouTube subscribers, argues that Ubisoft’s actions have rendered The Crew “unusable and deprived it of all value after the point of sale.” His contention is that The Crew was sold under a perpetual license, and by making it inaccessible, Ubisoft has violated consumer rights.

The Legal Argument

Scott’s legal challenge is a groundbreaking move in the gaming industry. He explains, “The argument is that The Crew was sold under a perpetual license, not a subscription, so we were being sold a good, not a service. Then the seller rendered the game unusable and deprived it of all value after the point of sale.” This perspective brings into question the legal definitions and consumer rights regarding digital products, a largely uncharted territory in law.

Consumer Rights and Digital Products

This lawsuit brings to light the often overlooked issue of consumer rights in digital purchases. With more games adopting an online-only model, the concern is that shutting down servers could render numerous games worthless, despite being sold under the guise of perpetual ownership. Scott’s lawsuit aims to set a precedent in determining the legality of such actions by gaming companies, potentially changing the landscape of digital consumer rights.

Ubisoft’s Stance and the EULA

Ubisoft’s end-user license agreement (EULA) for The Crew complicates the matter. The EULA states that the game is “licensed” rather than sold, and the terms can be altered at any time. This clause might be Ubisoft’s defense in the lawsuit, arguing that they have the right to shut down the game as per the agreement.

Ross Scott’s potential lawsuit against Ubisoft over the shutdown of The Crew could be a landmark case in the realm of digital consumer rights. It challenges the norms of the gaming industry and raises critical questions about the rights of consumers in the digital age. The outcome of this legal battle could set a significant precedent for future digital content and its ownership.

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About the author

Mary Woods

Mary nurses a deep passion for any kind of technical or technological happenings all around the globe. She is currently putting up in Miami. Internet is her forte and writing articles on the net for modern day technological wonders are her only hobby. You can find her at mary@pc-tablet.com.